Hardest working man in central banking

The title undoubtedly goes to Jaime Caruana, governor of the Bank of Spain, chairman of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, and a member of the governing board of the European Central Bank. The frequent flyer miles are piling up as Mr Caruana shuttles back and forth to Frankfurt, and criss-crosses the globe spreading the gospel about the Basel committee's new capital accord.
The title undoubtedly goes to Jaime Caruana, governor of the Bank of Spain, chairman of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, and a member of the governing board of the European Central Bank. The frequent flyer miles are piling up as Mr Caruana shuttles back and forth to Frankfurt, and criss-crosses the globe spreading the gospel about the Basel committee's new capital accord. All this leaves little time for Caruana to spend in his grand offices at the Bank of Spain in Madrid. In the last six months Caruana has given speeches in Dubai, Paris, London, Chicago and New York, chaired the Basel committee's key October meeting, testified in front of the European Parliament, and joined the Bank for International Settlements trip to Asia in November where he gave two more speeches in Tokyo and Beijing. Amid all this travelling, Caruana has found time to smooth the troubled path of the Basel accord towards its June 2004 completion date, to such an extent that seasoned Basel watchers speak of the "magic of Caruana". When interviewed for the December edition of The Financial Regulator journal (coming soon!) we asked the great man how he juggles his responsibilities. He modestly replied: "Tackling them requires some diligence on my part, and good collaborators. And I am lucky enough to have extraordinarily good collaborators in the form of the staff here at the Bank of Spain, and the secretariat at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel who are both first class."

  • LinkedIn  
  • Save this article
  • Print this page  

You need to sign in to use this feature. If you don’t have a Central Banking account, please register for a trial.

Sign in
You are currently on corporate access.

To use this feature you will need an individual account. If you have one already please sign in.

Sign in.

Alternatively you can request an indvidual account here: