Stanford's John Taylor on the global monetary system and central bank co-operation

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John Taylor believes a rules-based solution could restore global monetary stability

You have supported rules-based monetary policy for some time now, but your application of rules-based policy on an international scale is relatively new. How would that work?

My original idea was that central bank policy works better if it is more like a rule, more systematic, more predictable. Lots of research has gone into that, and there is a lot of experience of it, too. What we have seen – especially in the past dozen years amid greater integration of the international community – is that

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